Sunday, March 30, 2014

Bean and Veggie Enchiladas {Crockpot Recipe} :: Lenten Meal PlanLink-Up Week 5

I'm trying to get this week's Lenten Meal Plan Link-Up finished early, so you have lots of time to spend sharing your meatless recipes for others. Today is Laetare Sunday, which marks the halfway point (give or take a few days) in Lent. Have you tried any new meatless meals this Lent? There have been many, many great options shared by all of you fabulous people.

We've been expanding our Lunch options, and you can see some ideas we have tried in this post which features 10 lunch options. I have had to add small amounts of red meat back into my diet on days other than Friday just to keep my iron levels at an optimal place for Baby #3. Pregnant and nursing mamas - remember there are other ways to keep a fast or sacrifice during Lent! Don't put your health at risk. Add a rosary or read a few chapters of your Bible, but don't make yourself ill or put your baby at risk with your eating choices.

That being said, this week I am sharing a favorite recipe from our house that is easy, healthy, AND can be made in the crockpot. Win. WIN. Don't forget to go see what Beth Anne and Abbey are sharing on their blogs this week.  And keep sharing your awesome recipes!



Bean and Veggie Enchiladas 

Serves 6-8

1 red onion, diced small*
2 cloves garlic, minced*
1 red, orange, or yellow bell pepper, diced
2 16 oz cans of pinto or black beans, drained and rinsed
1 cup frozen corn
1 can fire roasted chiles
2 tsp chili powder
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp dried cilantro (if you have fresh, use fresh and add after cooking)
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 cups cheese, shredded - I use a mix of cheddar and monterey jack
2 16 oz jars salsa
8-10 8" soft tortillas

*If you want the flavor of the onion and garlic to be less strong, sauté first in 1 TB olive oil before adding below.

In a medium bowl, mix together onion, garlic, pepper, beans, corn, chiles, spices, and 3/4 cup cheese.


Pour about 1 cup salsa (1/2 jar) into slow cooker, spreading to cover the bottom. Scoop 3/4 - 1 cup of the above mixture into 1 tortilla, wrap it up, and nestle into the bottom of the crock pot. Repeat with 1/2 of the filling and tortillas.

Cover with another cup of salsa and 3/4 cup of cheese. Create 2nd layer of tortilla rolls. Top with another cup of salsa. Place lid on and cook 2-4 hours on low. In last 15 minutes, sprinkle leftover cheese (1/2 cup) and let melt.


Serve enchiladas with remaining salsa.

If you wish to cook in oven: layer rolls in 9" x 13" baking pan, and cover with foil. Bake at 400º for 20 minutes. Uncover, sprinkles with cheese, and bake another 5-10 minutes.


Enjoy!



If you're joining us for the Link-Up, grab the button above to add to your blog or website!

 Link up your Lenten meals here, and share with others, so we can all benefit from each other's Vegetarian wisdom! 

If this is YOUR first time joining, the Guidelines are as follows:
  1. Feel free to Link-Up any OLD or NEW meatless meals you have posted about.
  2. The hosts have the right to delete any links that are not appropriate for the link-up.
  3. Feel free to embed Pinterest Recipes or link to recipes you have found online.
  4. Feel free to just blog about what you ate or what you are planning on eating.
  5. Have fun and have a BLESSED LENT!
   
   

Don't miss a post! Subscribe via the RSS or email links in the top righthand corner. 

You can also follow me on FacebookTwitter, or Pinterest.





All rights reserved. ©Sarah G. Ortiz

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This post Veggie Pizza {Recipe} :: Lenten Meal Plan Link-Up Week 4 first appeared on Two Os Plus More on 25 March 2014

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Veggie Pizza {Recipe} :: Lenten Meal Plan Link-Up Week 4

Eeeps! Running late with this week's Lenten Meal Plan Link-Up. Don't worry - you still have several days until being called to being abstinent on Friday. And you can check out a whole bunch of recipes that have already been linked up below. Check out our group Pinterest page to see the ones Abbey, Beth Anne, and I find throughout the week. Make sure to go visit Beth Anne and Abbey and their new posts, too!

Today I'm sharing one of our all-time favorite recipes: Pizza! Our whole wheat crust makes a perfect canvas for a variety of veggies. It's delightful and looked forward to by all in our family.



Dough Recipe for BreadMaker

Place into bread maker in this order:
1 tsp brown sugar
1.5 cups warm water
1 TB olive oil
1 tsp sea salt
3 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
1 TB yeast
Optional: Put Italian spices in with the flour. Equalling 1 tsp, put in a mix of basil, oregano, and thyme.

"Cook" on Dough cycle. When dough finishes, place in well oiled bowl and cover with towel. Let rise for 45 minutes - 1 hour in warm place. Preheat oven to 475ºF. Roll dough out on floured surface to desired size and place on lightly greased cookie sheet or pizza pan.

I then aerate with a fork to lower chances for bubbles, and I splash a little olive oil, a sprinkling of salt and pepper, and a TB or so of freshly minced garlic on the plain dough.

Cook for 5 minutes.

Lower heat to 415ºF. Place toppings on, and bake for 12-15 minutes or until cheese is bubbly.


10 of our favorite toppings
  • caramelized onions
  • roasted veggies - brussel sprouts, broccoli, peppers, onions
  • mushrooms
  • pesto - stir in with sauce
  • goat cheese - feta, chèvre, etc
  • baby spinach and ricotta
  • brie and figs
  • pear, thinly sliced, and blue cheese
  • red onions, kalamata olives, fresh basil, sundried tomatoes, and pine nuts
  • crack an egg on top before putting in, and it will fry on top!


Enjoy!
Sarah



If you're joining us for the Link-Up, grab the button above to add to your blog or website!

 Link up your Lenten meals here, and share with others, so we can all benefit from each other's Vegetarian wisdom! 

If this is YOUR first time joining, the Guidelines are as follows:
  1. Feel free to Link-Up any OLD or NEW meatless meals you have posted about.
  2. The hosts have the right to delete any links that are not appropriate for the link-up.
  3. Feel free to embed Pinterest Recipes or link to recipes you have found online.
  4. Feel free to just blog about what you ate or what you are planning on eating.
  5. Have fun and have a BLESSED LENT!
   
   


Don't miss a post! Subscribe via the RSS or email links in the top righthand corner. 
You can also follow me on FacebookTwitter, or Pinterest.

All rights reserved. ©Sarah G. Ortiz
::This blog post may contain Amazon Affiliate links. 
By clicking through to make a purchase, you help to financially support TO+M::

This post Veggie Pizza {Recipe} :: Lenten Meal Plan Link-Up Week 4 first appeared on Two Os Plus More on 25 March 2014

Friday, March 21, 2014

In which I attempt all the Link-Ups {7QT, FF, WWRW}

Will this be insane? You betcha. Attempting 3 link-ups in one post might be confusion, but as I've started all these posts separately and finished none, I figured I might as well smoosh them all together for one big cowabunga post. *Cue insane laughter.* If I was the type that was able to find the perfect meme, this would probably be the ideal spot for it.

7 Quick Takes holding within themselves 5 Favorites that were passed onto me by the Irish people and their country, and then wrapping up with 2 QT devoted to What We're Reading Wednesday Friday.


1.
The Rosary

Ireland is by far my favorite place I've ever been - I have been to 20 of the counties in the Republic during my 5 different trips there. My first introduction to faithful Catholics who were not only willing to share their beliefs with me, but also hear my side and debate me in an open, fair forum were during those visits. My first trip to the Emerald Isle was a little over ten years ago, and as I originally went to work with an amazing pro-life group there, Youth Defence, I met many, many wonderful people. Although some of my time was spent "touring" per say, the majority of the time I spent there, which equals around 6 weeks, was spent making friends, promoting the Culture of Life, and having good craic with the Irish people.


And they were the first to introduce me to the Rosary. I knew what it was, of course, before going, and I think I'd prayed it with one of my uncles once before, but Youth Defence wrapped up many of their demonstrations with everyone praying the Rosary together. One of my friends I made there after many late night theology discussions made sure I went home with my own rosary and a booklet explaining the mysteries and other prayers.

Last week I met up with a few local Catholic mamas to pray the rosary together, and as I sat there, fingering my beads, I thought back to those many times I prayed with the Irish. How thankful I am for the love they have for Our Mother and how they share it with all they meet.

I also can blame my switching up the words in the Fatima prayer on them.


2.
Beer

I also completely blame my love for beer on Ireland. Stereotyping a little? Why, yes. While there, I spent nearly every night in one pub or another. My beer knowledge was overly limited when I went, so I turned to one of my Irish friends and had him point me in the right direction. And thus it began. I have since tried many a beer, some I've hated, some are meh, but I have also found quite a few I love.

On another note, I have craved beer the majority of this pregnancy. Thus, I feel this baby should have a good Irish name. It's only fitting.


3.
Rainy days

They might not love it, but I adore the rainy overcast weather that Ireland often has. Whenever we get similar temperatures and fogginess here in the US, I always liken it to my days there. 50 degrees. Slightly breezy. Foggy dew abounding. Such perfection. Cold enough to need a sweater and perhaps leg warmers, but not SO cold that you feel your nose hairs are ice. It's the best.


4.
Life + Families

Being in Ireland to work specifically with a pro-life group, active on the streets alongside them, gave me a lovely insight into the Love the Irish have for all life and especially for family life. The inclusion of all was something that was seen whether attending an awards banquet or a dinner in someone's home. The younger children were always a part as were the elderly. Babies abounded everywhere you looked. Even in the early hours in the pubs, you would see families meeting up together.

Although I don't think each and every American thinks this way, I do believe the American culture lives in the selfish bubble of believing children are on the whole, a nuisance. The "seen, not heard" concept still runs strong in many an American's vein. In Ireland, this just isn't so. And it's a beautiful thing. May we seek to make that so in our own country.


5.
A Slower Pace

I first learned this in Ireland, and then I saw it again in the Philippines, England, Scotland, and Nicaragua. Another thing I think we lack in the US (as well as other places, I am sure) is that calmness that comes from just taking a break in our day. My mama, when we were young, made a point to stop our homeschooling day with an afternoon tea, where we all stopped, sat, and just enjoyed one another. The days and weeks of a typical American seem to be the opposite.


I saw a quote the other day that now, of course, I cannot find for the life of me that basically said if we take the time to set aside Sunday to enjoy and rest, we will have the calm and joy we need to fill the other 6 days. Just a thought.


6.



And now beginning what we're reading Wednesday Friday.

In order to encourage his listening skills and move our way into more serious reading, I have been trying to keep a chapter book going with Dominic at all times. I will share more of our favorites at another point, but for now, we are in the middle of Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle's Farm. The chapters are a bit on the longer side, but if I read them in halves, Dom is perfectly delighted to sit through each one.



Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle is a woman with a farm full of animals who takes in children with bad habits that need correcting. Two weeks at her abode and the kids go home with new attitudes. There are three books preceding this one, but this just happened to be the one at our library, and it doesn't seem to matter that we skipped to the last. Reverse Psychology and hands on learning are Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle's "secrets" to fixing the children, and each child has glowing reviews of their time spent with her.

Some things are a bit dated in the stories as its original publishing date was in the mid 1950s. For instance, the food described might give you an ulcer - it is overly reminiscent of the post that was circulating with the Truly Upsetting Vintage Recipes. There is also mention of "beating" kids though it never actually occurs. Obviously if being read aloud, this can be glossed over or changed if you want, but just so you know, it is there.

Overall, we are enjoying it, and the delightful art from Maurice Sendak makes it all the more fun.


7.



And this mama is reading The Paradise: A Novel. I picked it up on a whim as it was in the "New" section of the library, and I'd seen the TV series (it made my "5 Series to Watch in the Absence of Downton" post). The series is loosely based on this book by Emile Zola that is nowhere near "New," having been written over one hundred years ago.

I am only a few chapters in and "loosely" is the perfect word to describe the relationship of the book with the show. That being said, I am enjoying the book thus far. There are more characters to be discovered and the approach to capitalism when the big store was a new thing is intriguing. Thus far
I think Zola gives an unprejudiced outlook of the big store as it advances in its successes and the mom and pop shop closes down as a result. I'm excited to see what else the book holds that was not shown in the TV adaptation.


And there you have it, three link-ups in one. I think I'm only half crazy, but I might not try this again for some time.

Linking up with:

Hallie @ Moxie Wife


and Jessica with WWRW @ Housewife Spice


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All rights reserved. ©Sarah G. Ortiz
::This blog post may contain Amazon Affiliate links. 
By clicking through to make a purchase, you help to financially support TO+M::

This post In which I attempt all the Link-Ups {7QT, FF, WWRW} first appeared on Two Os Plus More on 21 March 2014

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Celebrating the Feast of the Annunciation

   Having recently been received into the Roman Catholic Church, this will be the first time our family celebrates the Feast of the Annunciation, which happens on March 25th or this year, a week from tomorrow. Although what the Feast celebrates is known and talked about in the Protestant faith, there isn't a particular day when it is shown honor. We're excited to be celebrating it in our family for the first time!

The Annunciation by Fra Filippo Lippi
The Solemnity of the Annunciation, set exactly 9 months before Christmas, is a feast to celebrate the beginning of the God's plan for salvation. A principal Marian feast, this day is marked throughout the Christian year in the prayer practices of the Rosary (first joyful mystery) and in the Angelus. We celebrate when the angel, St. Gabriel, came down from heaven to tell Mary of God's plan to impregnate her by the Holy Spirit. And we also celebrate her Fiat, Mary's humble yes, that began a plan greater than she could have imagined.

The above painting is my favorite depiction of The Annunciation because you can see God's hands reaching down from Heaven, sending forth the Holy Spirit depicted as a dove, to place His Son, Jesus, into the Virgin's womb. What a beautiful image of the Holy Trinity!

Even though this special day often falls during the Season of Lent, this Feast is a Solemnity, so our penance obligations are lifted for the day. Therefore, it is perfectly appropriate to enjoy a sweet treat that you otherwise might not be or for example, for us, we will enjoy meat with our dinner meal.

Another interesting fact: As this date is close to the vernal equinox (March 20th), it was marked as one of the "Quarter days" from medieval and early modern England. The other three are the Nativity of St. John the Baptist, Michaelmas, and of course, Christmas.



Traditions

   In Sweden, the Feast of the Annunciation is also called "Vaffelsdagen" or 'Waffle Day.' This came about because the vernacular of two phrases was remarkably similar. It was originally known as which was: "Vårfrudagen" or 'Lady Day,' which, even if you don't speak Swedish, looks pretty close.

Because of the focus on the coming of Christ to us in the form of a human within the womb, this Feast day has always had a celebration of the pre born associated with it. This was the moment the Word became Flesh, written clearly for all Christians in the Gospel of John. It is our celebration of the actual Incarnation of Christ. In today's day, this is more important than ever, and it is a great time to remember the Unborn in prayer and in action.

In England, farmers used to plant their crops the day after this Feast, following a rhyme that stated:

Saint Gabriel to Mary flies:
This is the end of snow and ice.

Food

In keeping with the above mentioned traditions, both waffles and a seed cake are perfect for this Feast! We will probably enjoy a waffle breakfast, maybe with some blueberries? Lingonberries are tradition in Sweden, but I'm not sure where I'd find them around here. The seed cake ties into the English traditions with growth and a new harvest on the forethought of farmers' mind. This recipe from RecipeWise looks like what I'd imagine (plus it reminds me of Mrs. Pattmore). I am not a fan of caraway seeds though and would substitute poppy seeds.

For your dinner table decorations, you could set the table with flowers that honor Our Lady. A few that tie directly to the Annunciation are red carnations (symbolize 'incarnation'), baby's breath (innocence, spirit) and ivy (eternal fidelity).


Crafts + Activities

Puppets! Yes, please! Love this idea from Lavatican. Just print, glue on to popsicle sticks, and reenact the scene between the Holy Mother and St. Gabriel. If your kids aren't up for puppets yet, you can always just color in the coloring page.

Pull out Mary and the Angel from your Nativity sets. Christmas wasn't too long ago - you still remember where you stored them away, right? I think I do…

Plant some marigold seeds. This flower was named especially for Mary, and this activity notes that spring really is coming! A great way to talk about how just like seeds grow under the dirt, babies grow in their mama's bellies where we cannot see them, but we know they are there.

Listen to some Marian hymns - there is a whole album by the Daughters of St. Paul dedicated to them on Spotify.




Pray and Act for the Unborn - say a special prayer for the Crisis Pregnancy Centers in your area, pray a rosary in front of an abortion clinic, donate diapers/wipes or gently used clothing to a Center in your area.


To Read



Tomie dePaola's Book of Bible Stories - many other Children's bibles include this important part of Christ's story, so check whichever bibles you have in your house, too! This is just one of our favorites. 


Another lovely book by Tomie dePaola: Mary, the Mother of Jesus



Mary, Mother of Jesus by Mary Joslin + illustrated by Alison Wisenfeld


The Life of Mary by Inos Biffi + illustrated by Franco Vignazia



The Life of Jesus by Mary Billingsley - I have not read this one yet, but it looks intriguing as it shows the mysteries of the Holy Rosary in pictorial form with the Biblical story for each one.



Orazio Gentileschi

Prayers

Obviously as mentioned above, both the Angelus and the first Joyful Mystery of the Rosary are directly about the Feast of the Annunciation. If your children are up for it, saying the Joyful Mysteries as a family would be great. If they are, like mine, too wiggly to sit through 5 decades, perhaps just try saying one decade.

Talk about how the Hail Mary prayer that we pray incorporates the archangel Gabriel's greetings to Mary when he came to visit her. 

The Angelus is prayed at 6am (more power to you if you're up and praying at that time!), noon, and 6pm. Try for all three, or just hit one or two. Again, unless your children can read or already know the responses, this might be hard with younger kids. 


The Word is made Flesh. Let us Rejoice! Happy Feast of the Annunciation to you and yours!
Sarah

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This post Celebrating the Feast of the Annunciation first appeared on Two Os Plus More on 18 March 2014

Monday, March 17, 2014

More Meatless Meals! :: Lenten Meal Plan Link-Up Week 3

We're here at week 3 of the Lenten Meal Plan Link-Up - go visit my co-sponsors, too, and see what kind of deliciousness they've conjured up: Beth Anne at Beth Anne's Best and Abbey at Surviving Our Blessings. This week I'm sharing a few meatless meals that are more recent here on the blog and didn't make it to what is now my all time most popular post: Meatless Meals for Lent.

So, here you have More Meatless Meals! Bon Appétit





Since it's St. Patrick's Day, I'll start off by sharing one of our favorites that we often make to celebrate both the Feast of St. Brigid and then the Feast of St. Patrick. This Guinness Stew is filling, warming, and can easily can be made meatless though the recipe does call for beef. Skip the first step, and add an extra can of kidney beans for the protein.




This one is a new, new addition making its debut on the blog just this past week, but it's super yummy and pretty easy. I am sure it'd taste delicious with some bacon thrown in, but that'll just have to wait for after Lent.




Super, super easy, and one that will be making our meal plan either this week or next.




Another easy one - this one is just a matter of collecting ingredients, depositing into your CrockPot, and enjoying when done. Also is on my "To Make" list for this Lent.




Very flexible, this post shares many ideas for making tasty grilled cheese sandwiches. One of my favorite things and a great way to give life to older bread, these options are pretty fancy, but still simple.




And last, but not least, this is one from Catholic Cuisine: Minestrone Soup for St. Joseph's Feast Day, which is this coming Wednesday (March 19th). Love, love, love this soup! Everyone in my family eats it, the variety of beans makes for welcome energy, and it reheats well. As it makes TONS, it's perfect to invite others to share in your Lenten meal as well. This is on our menu for St. Joseph's Day this year. 



If you're joining us for the Link-Up, grab the button above to add to your blog or website!

 Link up your Lenten meals here, and share with others, so we can all benefit from each other's Vegetarian wisdom! 

If this is YOUR first time joining, the Guidelines are as follows:
  1. Feel free to Link-Up any OLD or NEW meatless meals you have posted about.
  2. The hosts have the right to delete any links that are not appropriate for the link-up.
  3. Feel free to embed Pinterest Recipes or link to recipes you have found online.
  4. Feel free to just blog about what you ate or what you are planning on eating.
  5. Have fun and have a BLESSED LENT!

   
   


Don't miss a post! Subscribe via the RSS or email links in the top righthand corner. 

You can also follow me on FacebookTwitter, or Pinterest.
All rights reserved. ©Sarah G. Ortiz

::This blog post may contain Amazon Affiliate links. 

By clicking through to make a purchase, you help to financially support TO+M::

This post More Meatless Meals! :: Lenten Meal Plan Link-Up Week 3 first appeared on Two Os Plus More on 17 March 2014


Saturday, March 15, 2014

Adult Style Mac n Cheese {Recipe}

Mac n Cheese is my Achilles heel. It's just one of those foods I crave now and again and simply *need* to have. I've been perfecting my recipe to where I feel it is mostly adultly acceptable, so here it is. Best part is my kids think it's just as delicious as I do, so there is happiness all around. Call it fancy, gourmet, or what you will. I think it's pretty durn tasty.



Ingredients:

16 oz pasta - I tend to go for a vegetable or whole wheat one to add the health points
1 cup frozen broccoli florets
1/2 cup frozen peas
1/3 cup butter
1/3 cup whole wheat flour
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp freshly ground pepper
1/2 tsp paprika
1/4 tsp ground mustard seed
1/2 tsp worcestershire sauce
2 1/4 cups whole milk (you can use a lower fat percentage, the sauce just won't be as creamy)
1 cup shredded cheddar
1 cup shredded gouda
1/4 cup chèvre
1/8 cup panko bread crumbs
extra paprika
fresh parmesan reggiano, shredded fine (optional)

1. Preheat oven to 350º

2. Cook pasta as package directs in large pot. In the last 5 minutes of cooking, add frozen vegetables.

3. While pasta and veggies cook, melt butter in a saucepan on low heat. Once completely melted, stir in flour, salt, pepper, paprika, ground mustard, and worcestershire sauce. Stir until smooth and bubbly, stirring constantly over low heat. Remove from heat.

4. Off heat, stir the milk into flour and butter mixture. Return to medium-high heat. Heat to boiling, stirring constantly. Mixture will start to thicken considerably. Once sauce reaches boiling, boil for one minute, and remove from heat. Stir in cheeses (except parmesan). If cheese does not melt, cook over low heat, stirring, until all cheese is melted.

5. Drain pasta and vegetables. Place in a large casserole dish greased lightly with butter. Pour cheese sauce over top, and gently stir together.

Tip: To grease a casserole dish, place in warming oven for 1-2 minutes. Remove, and take stick of butter and rub around all surfaces.

Sprinkle bread crumbs, extra paprika and shredded parmesan cheese over the top of the pasta. Bake for 20-25 minutes, uncovered, or until bubbly. Enjoy!



Don't miss a post! Subscribe via the RSS or email links in the top righthand corner. 
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All rights reserved. ©Sarah G. Ortiz
::This blog post may contain Amazon Affiliate links. 
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This post Adult Style Mac n Cheese {Recipe} first appeared on Two Os Plus More on 15 March 2014

Thursday, March 13, 2014

St. Patrick's Day Trinity Shamrock Craft

With St. Patrick's Day coming up on Monday, I wanted to share a craft we did last year to celebrate: making a simple shamrock craft to demonstrate the Three in Oneness of the Holy Trinity. This craft is perfect for younger grade school age kids or preschool/toddler age with assistance.




Also, for more ideas on how to celebrate the feast day of St. Patrick, you can check out last year's post on what we did. Have fun!

*The original idea I got from Karen in Mommyland, and then we changed what it said on the back, added learning notes along the way, and I am sharing a template I created to make it easier.*



What you'll need:

Construction Paper - I used 1 sheet each: green, red, white, brown

Colored Wood Craft Sticks - 2 green If you don't have these, paint your own plain sticks ahead of time or color in with a green marker.

Glue - a glue stick can be used for the paper parts, especially with younger kids

Scissors



{Step 1}

Here is a free template with all the shapes you will need as well as part of St. Patrick's Lorica.

Trace shapes onto paper. You'll need 3 green large hearts, 1 small red heart, 1 brown cross, and 1 white dove. Cut out shapes.

If children are younger, you might want to do this step in preparation before starting.

Talk about the hearts each representing God's great love for us.

{Step 2}

Glue 3 green hearts together at the "base" of each of the hearts.

Talk about how God is 3 persons, but 1 nature. The three hearts come together to form one shamrock shape.


{Step 3}

Glue each of the smaller symbols onto the the larger hearts.

Talk about how the heart represents God the Father; the cross God the Son, Jesus; and the dove, God the Holy Spirit. Since Lent is in full swing, and Easter is on its way, this would be perfect to mention God the Father sending the Son to die upon the cross for us. 

{Step 4}

Glue the two green wooden sticks together to form a cross.

Talk about the cross being the ultimate symbol of Love for us, Christ's sacrifice of Himself for our sins.

{Step 5}

Attach the wooden cross to the back of the paper hearts thus providing your shamrock with a stem and a support structure.

Talk about the strength the cross and Christ's passion gives us as Christians.


{Step 6}

Glue the words from St. Patrick's Lorica to the back above the cross.

Talk about St. Patrick's great faith as he went into an unknown land and how God blessed him with the strength and courage to love Ireland enough to come back and convert the entire nation to Christianity. 



Happy St. Patrick's Day! Enjoy your day as you celebrate this wonderful saint and patron of Ireland. Bail ó Dhia ort!



Don't miss a post! Subscribe via the RSS or email links in the top righthand corner. 
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All rights reserved. ©Sarah G. Ortiz
::This blog post may contain Amazon Affiliate links. 
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This post St. Patrick's Day Trinity Shamrock Craft first appeared on Two Os Plus More on 13 March 2014

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